Elm Road Generating Station

Elm Road Generating Station

Among the cleanest and most efficient coal-fueled power plants in the U.S.

The Oak Creek generating site is comprised of two power plants: Oak Creek Power Plant (OCPP) and Elm Road Generating Station (ERGS) (See the OCPP fact sheet for information specific to that plant.)

Location

The Oak Creek generating site occupies 1,000 acres of land on the shore of Lake Michigan, 20 miles south of Milwaukee.

Type of plant

The ERGS units are supercritical coal-based, base-load (typically operating 24 hours a day).

Number of active generating units

2 steam turbines

Years in service

Unit 1 2010
Unit 2 2011

Generating capacity

Unit 1 634 megawatts
Unit 2 634 megawatts

Total net generating capacity

1,268 megawatts

Fuel

Pulverized coal; natural gas or propane for boiler start-up.

Coal handling

The Oak Creek generating site uses a shared coal handling and distribution system for ERGS and OCPP. The coal handling information here is specific to ERGS.

Transportation

  • Unit train
  • 130 coal cars per train

Storage

  • Indoor: 55,000 tons
  • Outdoor: 330,000 tons

Preparation

  • 10 pulverizers crush coal at 58 tons per hour each

Average coal use

6,000-6,400 tons daily (depending on system demands)

Boilers

One per turbine generator.

Height: 250 feet
Furnace temperature: 2,080 degrees Fahrenheit
Steam temperature: 1,050 degrees Fahrenheit
Steam pressure: 3,700 pounds per square inch

Ash handling

More than 99 percent of the fly ash is removed by a baghouse. Bottom ash is removed by a submerged conveyor.

Chimney

A single chimney serves both boilers. Height: 550 feet.

Cooling system

The Oak Creek generating site uses a combined cooling water intake system for ERGS and OCPP. Up to 1.56 million gallons (740,000 for ERGS and 820,000 for OCPP) of water from Lake Michigan are used every minute to convert the exhaust steam from the turbines back into water for reuse. The water is returned to the lake.

Control room

All major functions in the plant are controlled by operators with computer support to continuously monitor and report on pressures, temperatures, flow rates, etc. In addition, the computer aids in start-up, shutdown, load adjustments and information for future reference.

Updated: March 2017